June 20-22, 2018
Boston, MA
Only 34 Passes Remaining – Secure Yours Now

Workshop A
Wednesday, June 20

08.30am - 10.30am
Understanding Parkinson’s Disease Through the Gut Microbiome: Possibilities for New Interventions
Workshop Leader: Natalia Palacios, Assistant Professor, UMass Lowell

 

Parkinson’s disease is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that can cause a number of debilitating motor and non-motor symptoms resulting from the death of nerve cells within the substantia nigra. With the emergence of the gut-brain axis, a scientific phenomenon that is predominantly influenced by the gut-microbiota, scientists continue to investigate whether Parkinson’s Disease may be treated through targeting the gut, not the brain.

Join this workshop to:

 

  • Gain insights on the largest study to date on the gut microbiome and Parkinson’s disease to help demonstrate disease causation
  • Uncover the probable modes of action linking Parkinson’s pathology with microbiota composition
  • Discover how researchers are advancing new pre-clinical and clinical data to bring the scientific community closer to a cure for Parkinson’s disease

Natalia Palacios, Assistant Professor, UMass Lowell

Workshop B
Wednesday, June 20

11.00am - 14.00pm
Insights into Study Design & Analysis for Commercial Success in Microbiome Product Development
Workshop Leader: Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland Workshop Leader: Rodolphe Clerval, Chief Business Officer, Enterome Bioscience Workshop Leader: Alessio Fasano, Allan Walker Chair in Paediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, Massachusetts General Hospital

 

Within the last ten years, translational microbiome research has accelerated dramatically and due to it’s dynamic nature, the microbiome has potential to serve as a diagnostic guide, determinant of treatment response, or even be re-engineered as a therapeutic intervention in itself.

However, the diversity of the ways in which the human microbiome can be successfully translated into products leads to a number of technical challenges with study design and associated analysis.

Through the exploration of insights across pharmaceutical product development, this unique workshop aims to review standard techniques for study design within translational microbiome studies to help inform a number of aspects within a discovery, pre-clinical and clinical setting. This will include perspectives on sample collection and storage, methodology for sample processing, data storage and interpretation, sequencing selection and clinical trial-design/execution.

Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland

Rodolphe Clerval, Chief Business Officer, Enterome Bioscience

Alessio Fasano, Allan Walker Chair in Paediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, Massachusetts General Hospital

Workshop C
Wednesday, June 20

15.00pm - 17.00pm
The Role of the Microbiome to Improve Immunotherapy Outcomes
Workshop Leader: Lata Jayaramen, Head, Tumor Immunotherapy, Seres Therapeutics

 

Recent research on the interactions between the gut microbiome, immune cell function and emerging immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies have begun to show the microbiome’s impact on immunotherapy response. Through the discussion of recent publications, this is a great opportunity to understand:

 

  • The growing influence of microbiota on the efficacy of checkpoint inhibitors for immunotherapy
  • The prospect of developing drugs targeting microbial enzymes as chemotherapy adjuvants to mitigateinflammatory adverse effects
  • The role of microbiota in regulation of T cell subsets and cytokine expression
  • Probiotics and prebiotics: the metabolic capacity of gut microbiota to prevent cancer via anti-inflammatory mechanisms

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this workshop, we will discuss the inter-individual variation of the microbiome and how this is applicable to future immuno-oncology research. The strengths and challenges of high-throughput sequencing of human clinical samples and mouse models of cancer will both be explored.

Lata Jayaramen, Head, Tumor Immunotherapy, Seres Therapeutics